What the Tuck?!?!

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It’s time to debunk myths and set the record straight about the tuck. I’m talking about the pelvic tuck, also known as the pelvic tilt. For a while now, the tuck has become far too popular in fitness vocabulary. The word “tuck” has been used by weightlifters and CrossFit coaches to teach athletes to how to engage their glutes and open their hips; think at the top of a squat or a box jump. Yoga teachers have also taken to using the term to cue a flattening of the spine to prevent low back crunching. The tuck originated as a well-intentioned correctional cue. However, the tuck has taken on a life of it’s own. From a biomechanics perspective, the tuck is causing more harm than it is good as people are misunderstanding it’s proper use and purpose. If you have pelvic floor dysfunction or a diastasis recti or other core issue, the last thing you want to do is tuck your pelvis under you as it creates a reduced curve in your lumbar spine (your spine needs its curves for balance), it tightens the pelvic floor muscles, and it creates muscle imbalances in the hips and core. Having a pelvic floor dysfunction or core issue resolved by becoming aware of a tucked pelvis is very gratifying.

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