MoonLight Yoga

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MOON LIGHT YOGA The Devon Lakeshore Amphitheater

 

 

WHEN:
August 12 ……8pm   Jeff Hunt

Sept. 16……….8pm  Connie Pease

 

WHERE:
The Devon amphitheater
On the stage

WHAT:
A relaxing but challenging 70 minute Yoga practice with Jeff Hunt and Connie Pease. Jeff will be teaching the first 2 classes and Connie the 3rd.

Bring your mat……the Park District will have some blocks / straps and some yoga blankets. Free and open to the community.

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Your Teacher

My teacher is my life experiences and my teacher has taught me that “the harder you are on anything, the faster you destroy it.” So in pushing your body hard to achieve the generic prototype, the body is abused. Yes, you will get bigger and stronger or more flexible as the body responds to the abuse, but we are actually damaging ourselves and end up breaking ourselves down instead of building ourselves up. We still do not have proof that prettier, skinnier, stronger or more flexible people are healthier or happier. Yet if all you know pertaining to fitness is to push and be aggressive (“no pain, no gain”), then you will actually be doing this in your yoga practice, rendering it malevolent. So, let’s bring some awareness into our yoga practice, so we are not breaking ourselves down but building ourselves up.  Byran Kest

Strengthen The Spine and Neck -Ease Pain and Stiffness with Simple Changes to Your Alignment

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 “A fundamental aspect of yoga is the awakening of the spine’s ability to undulate and twist”
April 20th  1:00-5:00 pm
Classes will include asana practice as well as discussion of the following topics.
Anatomy and developmental stages of the spine
Discussion and assessment of spinal movements
Spinal orientation to gravity – sequencing and practice
The breath and the spine.
Tips for keeping the spine safe in yoga, including modifications and use of props
Yoga philosophy and how it informs what and how we practice
Contact Connie 217-620-3306 Cost is $50

2019 Yoga at the Library

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Calendar for Instructors

 

June

4 Krista Rasar

11 Kelly Sibthrop

18 Sue Weinstein

25 Nikki Hebert

July

2 Hope OConnor

9 Sue McElroy

16 Connie Pease

23 Sue Weinstein

30 Nikki Hebert

August

6 Kelly Sibthorp

13 Connie Pease

20 Sue Weinstein

27 Jeff Hunt

September

3 Connie Pease

10 Sue McElroy

17 Kathleen Owen

24 Nikki Hebert

October

1 Connie Pease

8 Connie Pease

15 Sue Weinstein

22 Sue Weinstein

29 Nikki Hebert

November

5 Jeff Hunt

12 Connie Pease

19 Sue Weinstein

26 Ginny Fitzjarrald

December

3 Jeff Hunt

10 Sue Weinstein

17 Connie Pease

26 No Class

31 No Class

 

 

 

 

RENTAL INFORMATION

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The Barn Studio ( Yoga at Connies) welcomes classes & events in the arts, movement, healing & transformation and is available to rent for your classes, workshops, group meetings, small performances and events. Starting in October….

With 1200 square feet of teaching space, Refurbished barn, beautiful natural light, an additional prop/cloak room, and entry lobby . The Barn offers a warm, simple and quiet space. The Barn is located on the Pease Family Farm . It is a place filled with life, laughter, connecting with each other, and inquiring within.

Amenities: We have 20 folding chairs, 25 bolsters, 50 woolen blankets, cotton blankets, straps, blocks, wedges, eye pillows, and an Bose docking station. The studio has various lighting options from cozy to bright. A small lobby with sign-in desk,  and 1 Restroom is available.

Rates: Call for pricing.

Special Weekend and Daylong Rates for workshops.

Attendance: We estimate that the room can comfortably hold about 30 people for yoga and about 45 for seated events.

Ample parking is available at the building.

Advertising: We are happy to include your class or event in our newsletter , e-news and on our website, as long as we receive your information prior to printing/posting dates.

Insurance: Yoga/movement instructors & therapists/healers need to carry professional liability insurance which names the studio as additional insured—contact us for specifications. Others generally do not need insurance to rent the space. Note: Insurance is required for some types of events. Please contact us for details.

Cleaning: You are responsible for leaving the studio as you found it. Renters need to plan time to clean up the studio after a workshop, performance or event.

Pets: Please no pets in the studio unless it is an assistance animal.

The owner, Connie Pease, reserves the right to partake in events, workshops, and classes held at the studio free of charge.

Contact Connie for more info -217-620-3306

What the Tuck?!?!

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It’s time to debunk myths and set the record straight about the tuck. I’m talking about the pelvic tuck, also known as the pelvic tilt. For a while now, the tuck has become far too popular in fitness vocabulary. The word “tuck” has been used by weightlifters and CrossFit coaches to teach athletes to how to engage their glutes and open their hips; think at the top of a squat or a box jump. Yoga teachers have also taken to using the term to cue a flattening of the spine to prevent low back crunching. The tuck originated as a well-intentioned correctional cue. However, the tuck has taken on a life of it’s own. From a biomechanics perspective, the tuck is causing more harm than it is good as people are misunderstanding it’s proper use and purpose. If you have pelvic floor dysfunction or a diastasis recti or other core issue, the last thing you want to do is tuck your pelvis under you as it creates a reduced curve in your lumbar spine (your spine needs its curves for balance), it tightens the pelvic floor muscles, and it creates muscle imbalances in the hips and core. Having a pelvic floor dysfunction or core issue resolved by becoming aware of a tucked pelvis is very gratifying.

The true meaning of APARIGRAHA (letting go)

 

 

 

Let-Go

The true meaning of APARIGRAHA ( letting go)
This week has been troublesome. My father has COPD and was admitted to the hospital on Wednesday for breathing issues. He could not catch his breath which is life, and all I could think about was he was losing his. I wanted him to try harder because I know when the breath is held too long that what nourishes us can turn toxic. The hospital room was full of chaos that Wednesday evening before a nurse took my dad’s hand while he was grasping and began to pray for breath. There was a calm that came over the room, and at that moment there was peace. The nature of aparigraha is impermanence – everything changes. Falling back to the breath and watch the rise and fall of each inhalation and exhalation, we can feel the truth of the transience of all things. My dad’s fear was gone as he returned to his breath. Dad told me later he felt he had only a few breaths left that night. In my heart, I knew he was right.
APARIGRAHA means nonpossessiveness and can also be interrupted as nonattachment, nongreedy, clinging, better said “letting go.” Our journey in this life should be light while caring and enjoying thoroughly.
Why is aparigraha so hard to practice? Still unable to shake the worry and stress, so I then decided to dive deep into trying to understand better what practicing Aparigraha meant. Is it just letting go, detaching yourself? Or is there more to it. I wonder how many suitcases of expectations, plans, resentments, and unforgiven moments I carry around with me on a daily basis. “Aparigraha is taking what we need: taking what serves us and letting go when the time is right. Aparigraha allows us to become more present by letting go of expectations.” I remembered this quote from a yoga tape I once watched, and I wrote it down for moments like these. I sat for a long time in silence, contemplating these two sentences. I dropped into a place of mental stillness that had been evading me for days. My faith in God and art of the practice is finding space to think clearly enough to discern what needs to be held closely and what needs to be let go. “Aparigraha isn’t about letting go of all things – it’s about letting go of the right things at the right time.” Practicing trust will keep us in check and keep us open to life’s unfolding.

LABEL ME-I DON’T THINK SO!

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Throughout our lives: families, teachers, friends and rivals are constantly sticking labels on us, saying what we can and cannot become or do. At times this is good; such as building confidence and encouraging us, however, there are times that people put negative labels on us such as loser, crazy, fat, nerd, weak, and incapable.
You cannot stop the negative comments, prevent the negative labels, but you can choose to stop putting yourself down.
Walt Disney was told that he wasn’t creative, Lucille Ball was told that she didn’t have any acting skills; the basic denominator in the success of these people is they chose to remove the negative labels.
My experience was when I labeled myself ” you can’t write”” In high school, my creative writing teacher informed me that I would never be quite as good as the rest, so I decided I wasn’t going to live with that label. Through diligence and constant practice to learn how to write has helped.
I hear students labeling themselves and other students in yoga all the time- “inflexible,” “weak” or “incapable.” Yoga doesn’t discriminate and you comparing yourself is robbing you of satisfaction. When these negative labels come up is to think first – it’s ok. Wrong labels can keep you from your practice; don’t go the next 20 years allowing one negative label hold you back. Once you let go of what defines you, then there will be freedom and awareness about the changes happening “WITHIN” your body. Make sure that you’re wearing the right labels, and always do your best and let yoga do the rest!! Have a great week, Connie

Don’t Make A Resolution—Make A Commitment

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When Does Movement Become Yoga?

One of the (many) things I love about  yoga teacher training is the interesting conversations that come up. We have talked about the difference between movement and yoga.
Is it when you teach a particular set of positions or actions? Is it when you can perform a specific set of poses? Maybe when you’ve mastered the ancient philosophy?
IT’S VERY HARD TO BE PURIST ABOUT YOGA GIVEN THAT IT, LIKE ANYTHING THAT’S IN USE, IS CONSTANTLY CHANGING.
Languages change all the time as people use them. The only ones that don’t are the ‘dead’ ones like Latin. Bodies change all the time as we use them too – it’s called adaptive change.
YOGA IS NO DIFFERENT?
Yoga has, in being, a rather twisted history (pun intended) and what we call yoga these days bears a great resemblance to what people called street contortionism a hundred years ago.
And a WHOLE bunch of poses that are in standard rotation now didn’t exist, to the best of my knowledge, when I started practicing yoga. Because it’s constantly changing. Knowing this broadens the scope somewhat for what could be called yoga.
HERE’S MY  TAKE
Is it the mindful movement? Is there breath awareness?
YES? THEN IT’S YOGA.
So running can be yoga, as can walking, as can movement and bio-mechanical explorations. Surfing. Cycling. Of course, when people come to a yoga class they aren’t expecting to go for a run, but rather to do stretchy things and breathe, but that doesn’t stop you from enjoying your run in a yoga-like way. The calm in the brain that keeps me coming back to my practice.
I have been known, quite regularly, to teach entire classes without ever teaching a ‘classical’ yoga pose. Guess I’m part of the living tradition then…